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BoJack Horseman

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Genres : Series | Comedy | Animation

Release Date : Aug 22,2014

Language : English

Total Episodes : 38

Ratings: 7.1 / 10 from 24 users

Meet the most beloved sitcom horse of the 90s - 20 years later. BoJack Horseman was the star of the hit TV show "Horsin' Around," but today he's washed up, living in Hollywood, complaining about everything, and wearing colorful sweaters.

Latest EpisodeSeason 4 Episode 13

Season 4

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Episode 12 - That Went Well 19 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 11 - That's Too Much, Man! 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 10 - It's You 17 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 9 - Best Thing That Ever... 19 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 8 - Old Acquaintance 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 7 - Stop the Presses 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 6 - Brrap Brrap Pew Pew 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 5 - Love And/Or Marriage 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 4 - Fish Out Of Water 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 3 - BoJack Kills 18 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 2 - The BoJack Horseman Show 17 Links 2016-07-22
Episode 1 - Start Spreading the News 18 Links 2016-07-22
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Episode 12 - Out to Sea 17 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 11 - Escape from L.A. 19 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 10 - Yes And 12 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 9 - The Shot 12 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 8 - Let's Find Out 11 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 7 - Hank After Dark 9 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 6 - Higher Love 10 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 5 - Chickens 10 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 4 - After Party 11 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 3 - Still Broken 10 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 2 - Yesterdayland 13 Links 2015-07-17
Episode 1 - Brand New Couch 12 Links 2015-07-17
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Episode 12 - Later 13 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 11 - Downer Ending 12 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 10 - One Trick Pony 13 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 9 - Horse Majeure 13 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 8 - The Telescope 13 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 7 - Say Anything 12 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 6 - Our A-Story Is A 'D' Story 12 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 5 - Live Fast, Diane Nguyen 12 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 4 - Zoes and Zeldas 13 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 3 - Prickly-Muffin 14 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 2 - BoJack Hates the Troops 12 Links 2014-08-22
Episode 1 - The BoJack Horseman... 12 Links 2014-08-22
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Series Parental Guide

nudity Since the world of 'BoJack Horseman' consists of human beings living intermittently with anthropomorphic animals, there is a natural relationship that coexists between species. This can lead to human-animal, or different-animal intimacy. This is considered normalcy in the show, but may prove awkward and disturbing to some viewers. BoJack Horseman is portrayed as a washed-up '90s actor who frequently sleeps with women. Sexual intercourse is depicted between him and strangers/partners occasionally throughout the series. It is strongly referenced that BoJack is unable to commit to a relationship because of his character, and that he is emotionally destructive towards his various partners. Whenever BoJack has sex with someone, he fantasizes about what he would've become had his career taken off, which allows him to achieve orgasm. This may prove disturbing to viewers. Even though many of these scenes depicting intercourse are played for dark humor, they portray BoJack's character as being one with intimacy problems and a strong egotistical background that prevents him from achieving orgasm normally, and also indirectly shows the tragic sexual lifestyles that many Hollywood celebrities face, at times to allow them to escape their bigger problems. Apart from the sexual scenes, there are, at times strong, verbal sexual references throughout the series, played mostly for comedy. References include human & animal intercourse and human & animal genitalia. This can range from passing remarks about how different animals perform during intercourse, to various strange reproductive patterns and systems of the characters in the show, to the sexual addictions and practices themselves. In flashbacks, BoJack reminisces about his abusive relationship with his mother, who is strongly implied to have become her character due to her past with abusive men. There is nudity in this series, but are only usually encased in paintings in the background of various scenes, and only encompass animals. This usually ranges from completely nude imagery with upper female body nudity depicted and genitalia obscured, but occasionally also shows full side profile nudity. One exception is a statuette outside a restaurant that serves as a set piece throughout many episodes, where a naked elephant granite statue has water shooting out of it's 'penis' into a granite seal statue's 'mouth'. [Season 1] There are several sexual scenes in this season, mostly played for dark humor. In 'Episode 2', BoJack Horseman has sexual intercourse (one night stand) with a woman after he criticizes her at a bar and she asks him 'You think I'm pretty?'. This act is not depicted on screen, but there is a trail of clothing and articles that lead from Bojack's car to his bed. Both of them are shown post-coitus, and the woman makes a passing remark that BoJack does 'weird stuff in bed'. BoJack has sexual intercourse with his agent in one episode. Thrusting movements are depicted clearly by BoJack, and he is shown climaxing in this scene after he fantasizes about his alternate reality lifestyle. His agent remarks that he is 'not even inside [her]' at one point. It is strongly verbally implied that his agent does not climax as well. BoJack has sexual intercourse with a female friend who used to be his childhood co-star. It is first depicted after one of them is intoxicated and possibly heavily drugged, then they proceed to take blankets and have intercourse off-screen. Realistic sexual moans are depicted in this scene. BoJack's friend becomes anxious about the situation that unfolds beneath him, before he is grabbed under, strongly implying a threesome. Post-coitus, his friend complains about how he had it 'stuck up there for two minutes'. Two bird reporters are depicted to have taken pictures of both characters mid-intercourse, and threaten to blackmail him and his agent afterwards. The pictures are shown repeatedly, with both characters assuming sexual positions, but graphic nudity/details are not seen. Another scene at the beginning of 'Episode 1' depicted a woman riding BoJack during sexual intercourse. She is seen thrusting with her back facing the screen and about to climax, when BoJack diverts his attention to watching a '90s sitcom with him as the star, he then climaxes himself and says 'That's good comedy.' This is played as dark humor and reveals disturbing qualities regarding BoJack's character. BoJack is seen thrusting on top of an unknown character and then climaxing. We then see him turn over on his back, satisfied, with no one on the bed with him, implying he was fantasizing to orgasm. Played for dark comedy. Another sexual scene occurs as part of a montage when BoJack celebrates a minor success in revitalising his career. Thrusting movements are briefly depicted as BoJack has his back turned toward the shot and his partner is not seen. BoJack passionately kisses and rubs Naomi Watts in one scene, where at one point they make out on a counter and rub each other's mouths with fondue, as Naomi aims to get into her character of BoJack's ghost writer as much as possible as they are filming a movie about an incident surrounding them. They later have sexual intercourse to get 'into character'. This is played for comedy. BoJack's childhood co-star is strongly implied to have been raised to treat the world she lives in with casual indifference, and to serve her fans and the paparazzi with as much effort as possible. This is emphasized when she is shown in the modern world in a music video where she poses suggestively in revealing clothing with other women, to cater to publicity and her own relevance in the current world. One of BoJack's long-time friends, who he had back-stabbed and left cold for 16 years, is depicted with his career ruined after he is exposed as a homosexual. Earlier in the season, as a flashback, he kisses BoJack as a sign of his hope for future success but both then uncomfortably remark that it was not intimate. A protester shouts at one point on a news screen regarding Hollywood execs (specifically BoJack's friend) lead 'flamboyant lifestyles'. There are several verbal sexual references in this season. A stronger reference is when BoJack Horseman is surprised at the fact that his agent and golden retriever friend (past rival) are in a relationship. He asks them whether they have had sexual intercourse, and his friend says 'Many times.'. When he asks whether 'that penis' has been in 'that vagina', his friend proceeds with 'Yep!'. Another strong reference is when a bird makes a passing remark regarding 'who do I have to blow to get some seed around here'. BoJack Horseman ends his relationship with his agent after a dinner showing his uncaring and insecurity disappoints her, and that he under-performs when being intimate with her. BoJack tries, at one point, to get back with her later in the season with new enthusiasm, but then comes to the realization that he was just personifying himself, and leaves her abruptly, with both being unhappy. It is referenced that they have had an on-and-off relationship before the start of the series, thus implying passive sexual experiences between both characters. Bojack is depicted nude briefly in one episode where full rear nudity is depicted. BoJack temporarily falls in love with his ghost writer, who was engaged to his golden retriever friend at the time. They kiss intimately briefly at one point, but they do not bring it up until Season 2 where BoJack and his friend conflict on a talk show. One of BoJack's friends befriends two carefree girls who are also running from the police who dress skimpily. BoJack's golden retriever friend remarks at one point that he has divorced twice, and BoJack's ghost writer becomes his third wife later in the season. BoJack's agent develops an intimate relationship with a tall stranger later in this season, which is actually three children on top of one another in a trench-coat. This is played as mild humor and intercourse is not implied. [Season 2] The most disturbing scene of intimacy in this season is when BoJack drives to New Mexico to visit a long-lost friend who played stage comedy with him, who has now raised a family. BoJack develops a strong relationship with the family for two months, before he opts, at one point, to drive her daughter to her first prom. When they leave early, her daughter develops a strong intimate reaction to BoJack as they bond together. When they arrive home, she tells him verbally that she is ready to have sexual intercourse with him in graphic detail, he then tells her she does not know what she is doing and rejects her, she cries and then leaves. Later, as BoJack and his long-lost friend bond, they kiss intimately and BoJack remarks to her how he wants them to run away like he fantasized in the previous season before she rejects him like how he rejected her daughter. However, BoJack and her daughter prepare to engage in sexual intercourse anyway and they are heard fumbling around. BoJack's friend then barges in and finds her daughter about to undo BoJack's bow tie and position herself. Her daughter remarks that they 'didn't even do anything' before crying and leaving. This scene, although disturbing and graphic in implication, is still justified by context and not excessive. One episode particularly deals with auto-erotic asphyxiation as the main theme, when BoJack's golden retriever friend discovers his dead agent hanging by a belt from the ceiling with his pants down while he seeks a new job, strongly implying he was in the middle of asphyxiating himself when he hung himself. Later, one of BoJack's co-stars remarks how he used to commit to auto-erotic asphyxiation, and uses a variety of terms. He brings BoJack his 'kit' that he used to use and describes, in detail, the contents in the kit, especially how a lemon allows him to achieve orgasm but prevents his chances of dying, and asks BoJack to keep it for him. He is later found in the episode also dead after attempting to commit the act. Both scenes show the characters off-screen, but hanging with their pants down. BoJack also attempts this himself to indirectly force his current girlfriend to say that she does love him, after earlier in the episode, when they indirectly wrongfully reference that they are not in a committed relationship. Although this episode encompasses a sexual fetish theme, impact is mitigated as it is mostly played for humor, and portrayals of victims are only depicted as aftermaths. Actual portrayals are never shown or implied on-screen. One of the side characters (BoJack's film director) in this season is depicted as a homosexual, when she passively remarks that she had an ex-wife to him. There are occasional sexual scenes in this season. A notable scene involves BoJack becoming intimate with an owl executive who had woken up from a coma of 30 years. He instantly falls in love with her as he is also mentally trapped in his 30 year-old self and they talk to each other the entire night, before BoJack remarks that it's morning and they've not had sex. She then remarks that 'It's not too late'. Both characters are then shown post-coitus in bed. She later develops a romantic attraction to a KGB sleeper agent before leaving him at the end of the episode. She leaves BoJack anyway close to the end of the season when he reveals himself to be uncaring to the people around him and depressingly negative the majority of the time. Aside from the sexually mature implications in this season, there are also a large variety of verbal sexual references, at times in detail. For example, in one episode, a hippopotamus character is strongly implied to have committed disturbing sexual acts to younger women over the course of a couple of decades. BoJack's film consultant and post-ghost writer tries to expose his acts of deviancy but in the end rejects her pursuit of him when she realizes this is all for the sake of her getting attention and being subconsciously pleased about it, and even if she did successfully do it, it would not affect his character too badly and is all for the sake of television and publicity. The acts are never depicted or voiced, as they are cut off mysteriously by other characters talking. This, in of itself, is played for humor. BoJack's agent develops a romantic interest with another agent situated one floor below her and they are shown kissing passionately briefly in an elevator before the doors close. Later, she asks him to close the door in her office before they start kissing and expositioning as they start taking their clothes off and prepare to engage in sex. BoJack's golden retriever friend interrupts their scene of intimacy and they pretend it had never happened. BoJack's childhood co-star is shown to have revealing, flamboyant clothing throughout one episode. BoJack's golden retriever friend is revealed to have an abusive marriage with one of his wives, shown indirectly in a flashback. BoJack's agent leaves her romantic interest, who is actually three boys stacked on top of one another, in an episode early in this season after she 'discovers he has a kid' and she decides she is not willing to commit to what she believes is a man who has raised a family.
violence Strong violence is occasionally portrayed in the show, and usually only aftermaths are depicted. However, brief bloody violence is depicted in some episodes. In almost every episode, slapstick humor is depicted occasionally with a joke. For example, in an establishing shot, a bird decides to fly away before it is hit head-on by a plane. [Season 1] In one episode, when BoJack and two of his friends are brainstorming to write his memoir in time for a deadline, they take an absurd amount of drugs [see Alcohol/Drugs/Smoking for more details], and one of them suggests strongly that were BoJack be killed by his childhood co-star, it would attract a tremendous amount of publicity. They are then shown rushing to murder BoJack with sharp, bladed weapons, before it is revealed to be a hallucination. They then indirectly, under the effects of multiple drugs, resolve hoe to 'solve the gun crisis in America' by giving everyone a gun. Both BoJack and his friend then hallucinate that they are carrying guns, but question whether it is actually brooms, and make a dramatic stand-off. Afterwards, blood is seen on smeared on the walls of BoJack's house when he explains to them to calm down.This scene is played for exaggerated humor, but disturbing when viewers imagine what they might have done to achieve so much blood loss. BoJack's childhood co-star stabs herself at one point to attract publicity, realistic blood spurts are depicted as BoJack drives her to the emergency room. She then seals it with duct tape off-screen. At one point, BoJack gets severely under drug influence, and his hallucination causes him to hallucinate a vision of his ghost writer into a horrifying, grotesque monstrosity. He then remarks 'Oh shit, I'm still tripping.'This scene is played for humor and different title cards enforce that. One of BoJack's friends gets sent to prison and has to join two rival gangs. He eventually tries to befriend both before they catch him and decide to curb-stomp his head. However, before they can do so, a helicopter manages to crash into the side of the building and the prisoners escape, forgetting their rivalry. BoJack gets into a brief fight with the man he had back-stabbed back in the '90s, who now has terminal rectal cancer. At one point, a Ryan Seacrest/Hollywood celebrity type on a talk show jokingly remarks how some lady who talked with him was kidnapped. In the fictional country of Cordovia, war violence is depicted as a side character who talks to BoJack's ghost writer for a proposal close to the end of the season is shown in a war-torn background, with air-strikes and shootouts occurring around him as he acts indifferently. He is shown passively covering bodies and making swift impromptu surgery on war-torn survivors, also acting with indifference. However, he does pose with dramatic encounters or people with dastardly physical experiences and takes a picture with his cellphone. BoJack's agent passively tells him that Andrew Garfield had 'broken every bone in his body' in one episode after he agrees to star in BoJack's upcoming movie, due to the failed erection of a building project by two of BoJack's friends. [Season 2] One episode deals with a genetically modified fast-food chain that has chicken as its staple course. One of BoJack's friends befriends a retarded chicken that, on the way of being transported to a mass slaughterhouse, escapes. He eventually rounds up some of BoJack's other friends to sneak into a farm where chickens raise mentally retarded chickens, but 'organically'. At one point, they have to hide in a small barn to escape from the chickens who own the farm, but then discover that they very violently slaughter the chickens raised there as well. This is seen as multiple bladed contraptions are hung on the walls and nailed to the floor, with blood around the bladed areas. An entire episode is dedicated to auto-erotic asphyxiation [see Violence & Gore for more details]. BoJack hits a conservative deer while driving his car with his girlfriend in one episode. Injuries are seen on the deer as he limps off into the woods, and his wounds are shown closer when they find him and take him to the hospital. The wounds themselves are limited to bloodied flesh and tissue, however, the deer groans painfully when BoJack hoists him over his shoulder. In later episodes, BoJack's car is seen with the damage encapsulating the hood. In one scene a minor former co-star of BoJack, who he has come to befriend, is released from jail and decides to accompany him on a heist. When she creates a distraction for him, she surprisingly pulls out a handgun in front of police officers and later they engage in a shootout. She briefly nails a police officer on-screen, who is seen to be gasping on the floor with a bullet wound. She eventually takes a Kalashnikov and fires blindly, briefly hitting another police officer with blood spurting as he falls out of shot, before they surround her and it cuts. When BoJack's post-ghost writer arrives in war-torn Cordovia to write about her associate, a billionaire bachelor, so she can feel like she made a difference, she is shocked at his indifference towards the conflict. She later befriends a boy refugee briefly, and learns that he is killed after an air raid destroys their base. One of BoJack's friends is kidnapped and impersonated by a representative of the fictional country Cordovia in one episode, which is in the midst of conflict, and runs around the remainder of the episode pretending to be BoJack's friend. He escapes later and tries to tell of the incident but does not manage to do so successfully.
profanity The expletive 'fuck' is said once every season, (intentionally so that it has more impact when it is used) by the characters out of anger and/or frustration when Bojack irreparably damages a relationship in the episodes "The Telescope", "Escape from L.A." and "It's You" and the stronger expletive 'cunt' is used once in Season 2 casually (the speaker then remarks that it is commonly used in Britiain) Other milder language, such as 'shit,' 'ass,' damn,' 'dick', 'pussy,' 'goddamn,' 'bitch' & 'son of a bitch' are infrequently voiced in almost every episode. Some of the characters like to be creative with their language, for example, BoJack's agent voices the word 'fish' in place of 'fuck' frequently in the series.
alcohol There are strong implications regarding drug use in almost every episode, where characters will passingly remark on situations/incidents or other characters in conjunction with drug use, and some episodes feature actual drug use being depicted by various characters in the series. Pills and other forms of drug paraphernalia can be seen in the background occasionally in almost every episode as well. One of BoJack's former co-stars is shown (and implied) being severely addicted to drugs throughout the series whenever she is present. BoJack is a welcomer to alcoholism and drinks different forms of alcohol (e.g. bourbon, whiskey, tequila, etc.) in almost every episode. He drinks from a flask frequently, at one point is shown drinking a few consecutively in a flashback. (In the series opening title, BoJack is depicted getting drunk at a party, at one point holding a glass of alcohol, then stumbling over the edge of his penthouse into his pool.) BoJack is also a frequent cigarette smoker and is shown passively smoking a cigarette in some episodes, obviously under a nicotine addiction. Various characters, other than BoJack, are also seen drinking alcohol and getting adversely drunk in some episodes. [Season 1] There are various depictions of drug use in this season, including one prolonged, somewhat excessive portrayal of drug use and the effects of drug use covering an entire episode. In 'Episode 11', Bojack, his former co-star and one of his friends attempt to finish his memoir by a deadline enforced to him, and enlist the help of his former co-star's assigned doctor, who openly gives them prescription drugs, that he knows she abuses frequently. After which, they are depicted not only abusing the prescription drugs but also snorting cocaine. They are then depicted to be typing out BoJack's memoir extensively at an alarming pace. They are then under the adverse effects of various drugs, and become temporarily insane, and hallucinate wielding guns at one point. After they consume even more drugs [comprised in a small montage featuring close-ups of the characters taking pills and snorting cocaine off-screen], it then spirals into a long, drawn-out hallucination with BoJack in the center of it, showing his fears and fantasizing about living an alternate life with a past friend, before he eventually wakes up in a filthy parking lot. Even though the depictions of drug use are explicit in the scene above, they are justified in the context that BoJack remarks them not to take drugs at one point, as well as showing his broken self afterward. The episode also emphasizes more on BoJack's hallucination to develop his character, and the drug use itself is not excessive. When BoJack meets his former co-star in 'Episode 3', she is strongly implied to be under the effects of drugs constantly, and at one point, hammers a handful of pills with her phone before snorting it. BoJack then questions her whether that is the appropriate way to consume prescription drugs. In the earlier half of , 'Episode 3', BoJack also encourages his former co-star to get into rehabilitation, to which she refuses and acts like he is rejecting her. He then gives in to her 'guilt trip' demands, to which she throws lavish parties at his house, where lemurs are seen in a state of intoxication in the background or doing crazy stunts, and a couple at one point snort a powdery substance and smoke marijuana in the background in a fleeting shot. BoJack replaces the fake bourbon with real bourbon at a commercial shoot in one episode, which leads him to become temporarily over-charismatic about his life and current situation, and his friend drinks an obscene amount of it by accident and becomes intoxicated throughout the episode, leading him to star in a quality commercial. BoJack is severely intoxicated off-screen in 'Episode 6', so much that he steals the 'D' work from the 'Hollywood' sign. Only the aftermath is show, and his intoxication is only discussed. BoJack is shown severely intoxicated in a couple of episodes, with many beer cans surrounding him. A race figure that BoJack looked up to during his childhood years is implied to have taken steroids and testosterone-enhancing drugs after he is revealed to have cheated on the racetrack. A young boy asks BoJack's agent, disguised as a man in a trench-coat, 'Would you like a alcohol?' [Season 2] One of BoJack's friends, at one point, gives up on her life temporarily and sleeps at his house, to which she becomes increasingly lazy and frequently consumes beer. She eventually brings him into her psyche, and they drink a horrendous amount of beer, at one point organizing the empty beer cans into various monuments off-screen. At one point in the same episode, while BoJack passively talks to his annoyed girlfriend, he and his friend smoke from a bong on-screen. One close-up shows his friend lighting the bong and smoking with bubbles heard. In one episode, a disturbing flashback shows BoJack, as a kid, sneaking a cigarette packet from his mother's purse and taking one out and smoking it, to his discomfort, before his mother comes in and marks her indifference to his actions, instead showing her disappointment in his existence, and forces him to finish the cigarette. This scene is disturbing and very distressing. One of the episodes features BoJack smoking a joint in a close-up briefly. BoJack, at one point, drives to New Mexico and decides to live with his long-lost friend and her family. When he brings her daughter and her friends to prom in her car, he sees one of them drinking from a flask, and when he confiscates it and tastes it, he remarks that 'whiskey and Red Bull' have high sugar content, and proposes that he get them bourbon and mix it with water instead. He then states that if they wish to drink, they should do so 'responsibly.' One of the friends eventually becomes more sluggish in her state of intoxication and passes out in a desert, needing to be taken to the hospital. BoJack's golden retriever friend is shown wearing a dog cone in 'Episode 1', after he could not stop biting his stitches due to him punching a mirror in a drunken stupor. This is only discussed.
frightening The entire series of 'BoJack Horseman' is dedicated to him living a life of excess, denial, inner fear, and adverse ego in the heart of Hollywood. He is shown exploiting and sabotaging people so that they can remain important and relevant to him, and is destructive to them regardless. Many of the episodes revolve around the satire of many elements, most notably the Hollywood celebrity scene and the various mishaps and wash-ups that rise from it. Other mature themes and elements discussed include feminism, indifference to war, popularity, paparazzi, reality-tv shows, news broadcasts, homosexuality, hipsters, self-personification, narcissism, etc; and encompass the group of people associated with it. One or more of these themes set the topic for each episode. In various episodes, a startling revelation which shows the horrendous attitude BoJack or other characters give to show their inner selves or their character arcs is depicted at the end, leaving the viewer in an state of melancholy and temporary depression. BoJack is shown abused by his parents (physically and emotionally) in flashbacks throughout the series. His father, an authoritative, restrictive man and his mother, a cruel, distant, disgusting woman both shape BoJack into what he is now. There is a strong existentialist/pessimistic worldview to the show, and many of the characters do morally questionable things sometimes (usually as part of a gag) with little or no consequences. The show itself is extremely down-to-earth despite its outrageous, childish premise, and many episodes seem to progress nowhere regarding character arcs. Most characters remain the same after a dramatic incident affects their life. [Season 1] In 'Episode 7', a man who BoJack betrayed 20 years from the current world, and suffers from terminal rectal cancer tells him, 'I'm not giving you any closure, now get the fuck out of my house.' In 'Episode 11', BoJack is seen in his childhood looking up to a racing figure, he writes a letter to him which he voices on national television. In the next episode, he is seen committing suicide by jumping off a bridge with news broadcasts overlaying regarding how he had cheated on the racetrack. In 'Episode 5', BoJack accompanies his ghost writer to her house in Boston because her father has just died, but treats his death with passive indifference. It is also in this episode where she is depicted to have come from a broken home and passively remarks that she was the most hated of them all at one point. Her father's dead body is also shown on a couch in the living room at one point, but that is played for humor. In 'Episode 2', BoJack gets into a major conflict with a Navy Seal for buying the muffins he called dibs on. He eventually apologizes on public television, but only on a reality TV show where popularity encapsulates the drama between the both of them. [Season 2] In 'Episode 1', young BoJack is shown watching the television broadcast of his racing hero reading his letter on television when his parents come home and shout at each other off-screen [their shadows are shown], they then throw plates at each other before his father storms out of the house. This entire time, BoJack is unable to hear what his hero had to say, and thus turns the volume up and sits closer to the small television. When his mother comes in, she asks him to stop sitting so close to it. In 'Episode 4', BoJack's golden retriever friend and his wife [BoJack's post-ghost writer] get into a huge fight after he throws her a surprise birthday party. She complains about how he does things for her, but only for his sake, but he later reveals about how his entire life revolves around her and hardly anything else. His wife later flies to war-torn Cordovia because she is not fulfilled with her current life, and tries to make a difference there. However, upon learning the bachelor she is writing for is helping refugees merely to create his legacy, she returns and decides to sleep at BoJack's house for the remainder of the season without returning to her husband. In 'Episode 8', BoJack's golden retriever friend hosts his own game show with the first episode featuring BoJack as his title contestant. Throughout this episode, BoJack is constantly harassed by his friend who humiliates him, and the conflict escalates until they fight regarding how BoJack kissed his wife. This is similar to the themes surrounding Season 1's 'Episode 2'. 'Episode 5' is a complete satire on gigantic fast-food chains and normal, everyday farms which run their own businesses, and focuses on the similarities between both joints when it comes to treating animals of lower intelligence and violently slaughtering them for consumption. It ends with how BoJack's friends, who spent the entire episode trying to rescue one chicken, turned fruitless when it was done via BoJack's connections with other people. In 'Episode 3', BoJack's long-time friend who he had betrayed back in the '90s dies, not of terminal rectal cancer, which he had gone into remission of, but because he got into a car crash with a truck, which he survived. Then got exposed to the peanuts in the truck which he was allergic to so he still died. This is played for humor and not depicted on-screen.

BoJack Horseman Series Screenshots

BoJack Horseman Series Director